Posts Tagged ‘HBO’

Original Source:

In light of recent news of Floyd Mayweather’s postponement of jail sentencing for his domestic issues, once again there has been rumblings of a potential block buster match up between Manny Pacquiao and Mayweather.

The only problem is Team Pacquiao.

For those who do not know, Mayweather will not have to serve time in jail until the 1st of June, leaving the original date of May 5th intact. Basically, the dooms day date for Pacquiao if he decides to man up and take the challenge,

In reaction to the postponement of Mayweather’s impeding sentencing and the possibility of matching Pacquiao against Mayweather in May, Bob Arum stated, “I don’t think it has any impact, no impact at all. Manny isn’t going to be ready to fight until summer time.”

Arum continued, “Manny has a severe cut, which Pacquiao suffered in a November win over Juan Manuel Marquez, which would prohibit the Filipino star from fighting until late spring, at the earliest.”

So the fight against Marquez took place in November right? Mr. Arum, you mean to tell the public that Pacquiao would have over five months to heal and prepare for this fight and the cut won’t be healed in time?

Andre Ward recently had a cut that postponed his fight against Carl Froch but the fight was only delayed about a month and a half.

But Pacquiao can’t get ready for a fight in May?

You say he will be ready in June or July, conveniently when Mayweather will be behind bars?

I have said this for awhile, despite all of the effort Top Rank Promotions, the ESPN Networks, even some world renown journalist/sports personalities have tried to deceive the public with, but the fact is Pacquiao has been ducking Mayweather.

He has been ducking competition period, and I’m not even mad at him for doing so.

Pacquiao reserves the right to choose whoever he wants to fight. Ultimately it’s his health, his life on the line. The only problem I have is all of the false accolades and hype these so called sports writers and media personalities want to bestow upon Pacquiao.

But he does not deserve the acclaim he is awarded with, especially for fighting predominately washed up fighters as of late.

His promoter Bob Arum likes to puff his chest out and exclaim certain things, but at the end of the day, he along with his star fighter is all bark and no bite.

“I will fight whoever, I am a fighter of the people.” A common sentence uttered after every one of his fights.

I don’t want to hear that, because you haven’t shown that.

But Mayweather is the one that fights for money, not pride or not for the people

So do you, you’re the same way. As a matter a fact, you’re worse. At least Mayweather is honest about fighting for large checks.

It’s not a problem fighting for large sums of money, but at the end of the day it’s honorable to fight for fair rates, and to fight guys who deserve that chance to go up against you. It’s honorable to test your abilities and fight the best opposition out there.

You claim to be an honorable fighter.

Claiming not to fight for money, but opted to fight against a 39 year old washed up Shane Mosley, who was coming off an one sided, comprehensive beat down from the hands of Mayweather, and a putrid performance that resulted in a draw against the likes of Sergio Mora?

According to Abac Cadero of the Philippine Star, Pacquiao is willing to fight Marquez for a fourth time, but only under the guarantee of receiving no less than a fighting purse of 28 million dollars?

In an interview with local media in his home province, when asked about his next opponent and the possibility of facing Marquez for a fourth time, Pacquiao proclaimed, “basta hindi bababa sa 28 million.”

Pacquiao is basically fighting for money and fighting guys with name recognition even if they are washed up.

The same reasons you opted to fight Miguel Cotto over Mosley a few years back, with Cotto being the larger name. It also didn’t hurt he was coming off a devastating loss and you MADE him meet you at a catch weight, another thing you’re good at.

You have ducked Mayweather for the past three years.

Your reasons being because of the random Olympic testing and what not. There has already been a ton of coverage regarding that whole issue, but at the end of the day, you were not willing to undergo the same testing Mayweather himself would go through as well and the fight never manifested.

To add on, your refusal to undergo testing displays your guilt. I don’t want to hear about your excuses of the blood process sapping your strength, or you being afraid of needles because it is all bull.

You have plenty of tattoos, there is video footage of you giving blood and there are plenty of athletes who get tested on a regular basis before participating in a sporting event and they are not affected by the small loss of blood.

You have always asked for concessions in your major fights, and in this case in particular, Mayweather conceded.

You guys had a 50-50 split on the purse, despite him being the bigger attraction ppv and money generating wise, he made your concession to gloves, ring size, and the 10 million dollar weight penalty, none of which by the way is in the Nevada State Athletic Commission.

All you had to do is take some blood tests. Some blood tests, and risk getting dominated inside the ring for the biggest pay day of your life. Some simple blood tests, for one of the biggest prize fights in history.

The reason you do not want to face Mayweather is you know he will out box you and make you look foolish. Mayweather is basically a stronger, faster, and even more intelligent version of your worst nightmare Marquez. Oh and Mayweather also has a five inch reach advantage over you.

ESPN, HBO and other media outlets do a great job of hiding your true self. You’re not the good character person they make you out to be. And there is no problem being who you are, you have that freedom. Who am I of all people to judge right? But the same thing should apply to Floyd Mayweather, to Mike Tyson, to Oscar De La Hoya, to whoever for that matter, but It doesn’t.

No one mentions your gambling habits, or alcoholic splurges among other things I won’t even mention.
As far as it goes within the boxing ring, you’re definitely a talented fighter, no doubt about that. But you’re not as good as they want to make you seem, and you have not only ducked Mayweather, but ducked other solid opposition for years.

Juan Diaz, Zahir Raheem, Joel Casamayor, Joan Guzman, just to name a few.

You have been ducking Marquez for years and the last fight that took place between you two shows why. Marquez made you look foolish, and you know deep down inside you lost that fight, among the other ones that took place between you two.

That’s probably why you want a guaranteed 28 million for that fight. Guess what, you can make even more than 28 million if you step up and fight Floyd Mayweather.

Take the test, and fight the best guy there is out there for you.

Original Source:

It’s a double dip of rematches headlining the boxing weekend.

The main attraction headlining the HBO line-up features Miguel Cotto seeking revenge against Antonio Margarito.

With the historic rivalry between Mexico and Puerto Rico boxers already, and the history between the two fighters that even precedes this fight, this is a compelling rivalry that has developed between the two Top Rank fighters.

The first fight between the two was a classic championship welterweight bout that took place in Las Vegas, Nevada back in June of 2008.

Cotto started out strong, displaying his technical superiority in the early rounds but Margarito’s pressure and will overwhelmed Cotto during the middle rounds and well into the later rounds which ultimately resulted in a Tko stoppage for Tijuana Tornado.

This would result in the first loss of Cotto’s career, as well as physical and psychological damage that may be beyond repair as since the fight Cotto has not looked like the same fighter.

A trail of controversy has followed Margarito’s since his win over Cotto beginning immediately when he squared off against Shane Mosley in 2009. It was discovered by Mosley’s trainer Naazim Richardson, that Margarito was attempting to enter the ring in his fight against Mosley, wearing loaded hand wraps.

Many have suspected along with Cotto himself, is Margarito may have used the same illegal wraps in their bout.

No one but Margarito, his promoter Bob Arum and his trainer at the time Javier Capetillo, knows what really happened that night with the hand wrap situation. I believe this is probably something Margarito has been doing for a long time, and it wouldn’t surprise me if his promoter had prior knowledge of this illegal activity taking place.

Regardless, this is an intriguing match up because of the personal emotions involved. Neither fighter likes each other, they probably do not have any respect for one another, and this fight is personal on many levels.

HBO did a great job hyping up this event, with the Face Off and 24/7 episodes respectively, promoting this fight. Both programs gave an in depth view of the relationships of the fighters, the ups and downs, family life, training camps, basically the paths each fighter has taken since their initial bout three years ago.

As for how the fight will turn out, unfortunately both fighters are shells of their former selves. Cotto has not looked the same physically since his fight with Margarito, and has struggled against Joshua Clottey, got annihilated against Manny Pacquiao, and did not look too impressive in his most recent fight against a washed up Ricardo Mayorga.

Margarito looks like he is on the decline as well. After Mosley utterly destroyed him, he was suspended for a year and looked bad in his comeback fight against Roberto Garcia. Margarito was then steam rolled by Pacquiao, who arguably administered one of the worst beatings in Margarito’s career.

They have both accumulated a lot of damage over the past three years including in their own fight, and I do not expect to see prime versions of either fighter. Margarito also has an eye issue, a n injury he suffered against Pacquiao and I think the injury is worse than what the public was lead to believe. The only reason this fight is continuing is because of the financial implications behind the fight.

As for who will win, I believe Cotto is the emotional favorite, the crowd will support him being there is a strong support for Puerto Rican fighters in New York, and I believe many people sympathizes with his whole story. I am personally rooting for Cotto, but I think if Margarito has anything left in the tank, he has the style that will beat Cotto.

Hand wraps aside, Margarito’s physical and mental pressure wore Cotto down and if that trend continues in the second fight, I see the same result occurring again.

If Cotto is to win this fight I believe he should target Margarito’s body as well as his damaged eye. Cotto would also do well to clinch occasionally and not let Margarito get into a rhythm. Mosley effectively implored this tactic in his win against Margarito, and Cotto would benefit from this as well.

Like stated before if Margarito does resemble some of his old self, I do expect his pressure to overwhelm Cotto.

The promoter of both fighters Bob Arum has other plans, as I’m sure he is hoping for a Cotto victory so he can attempt to pull off a third fight between the two in the future.

Also featured tonight is the bantamweight championship rematch between Abner Mares and Joseph Agbeko. This fight will take place on Showtime, and while I think this is a great fight and have anticipated this rematch for awhile, I think the timing is bad and Showtime did a poor job promoting this fight.

The first fight between the two was controversial and a great fight overall in itself. I think both fighters deserve the distinction of having the boxing public’s attention and should have all eyes on them during their bout. That won’t be the case with Cotto vs. Margarito airing on HBO at the same time but be as it may, this is going to be a great fight.

The first fight between the two was action packed, and expect much of the same in the rematch. Both fighters hurt each other, with Mares stunning Agbeko in the opening round, and with Agbeko retuning the favor in round four.

Unfortunately, Agbeko was the victim of many low blows that weren’t called by the referee and that may have played a factor in the majority decision that favored Mares.

I do think Mares will attempt to apply a more defensive game plan, and fight a more strategic fight imploring his counter punching abilities.

On the under card of the Mares-Agbeko card is a bout featuring Vic Darchinyan and Anselmo Moreno. Moreno has the style to beat Darchinyan and is very quick, but the question is whether he is ready to step up against great opposition. Darchinyan charges forward and has the power to out opponents out. He is also experienced and very cagey. An interesting fight to say the least.

Back on HBO, on the under card of the Cotto-Margarito head line, features two rising stars in Brandon Rios and Mike Jones.

Mike Jones a skilled, undefeated, powerful punching welterweight goes up against former Margarito opponent, Sebastian Lujan in an IBF title eliminator. I expect Jones to overwhelm Lujan, who after this fight may have to settle for being the division’s gatekeeper.

Brandon Rios, childhood rival to Victor Ortiz, goes up against Manchester’s John Murray in a lightweight championship bout. It was to be for a lightweight tile but Rios failed to make weight and was stripped of the title. Both fighters are young, experienced and talented. Look for Rios to pull out a tough victory in a highly competitive fight, but his body punching will lead him to victory in the end.

From the Honda Center in Anaheim, California, to Madison Square Garden in New York, New York, coast to coast this is a great weekend for boxing.

Whether if you’re a diehard or a casual fan, you’re in for a treat.

Original Source:

Perhaps by the definition of his job, the title of promoter, Bob Arum is arguably the best to ever do it.

Arum generally promotes his fighters as unbeatable menaces inside the ring, whom every other fighter (not under his Top Rank stable of fighters of course) is afraid of.

He builds guys up, deceives the common fan into mistakenly believing his fighters are the best of the best.

Arum has the tendency to match his star fighters up against tomato cans for the most part and eventually, at some point he matches his star fighters against each other and pockets a ton of cash at the end of the day.

I understand facing soft opposition every once in awhile is a part of the game, it happens all the time. It appears in recent years Top Rank fighters seem to do more often than not, and when they reach the highest level of their profession, generally continue to do so.

To his credit, Arum has promoted some great fighters in his career. Fighters such as Marvin Hagler, Joe Frazier, Muhammad Ali, Oscar De La Hoya, Floyd Mayweather, Manny Pacquiao, and Nonito Donaire just to name a few.

But in recent years, he has been fraudulent in how he has handled business and is one of the main contributors to the demise of boxing. Simply put, he is a poison, and does not care about the future of the sport.

Taking guys that are good fighters and deceiving the public into thinking they are actually great fighters. Fighters such as Antonio Margarito, Kelly Pavlik, Timothy Bradley and Manny Pacquiao just to name a few.

For example.

Arum created some kind of mantra, and actually fooled the public into believing Margarito is the most feared and avoided man in boxing. Please.

Aside from being a full fledged cheater, Margarito was an overrated pressure fighter, who had an exceptional chin and great endurance, but lacked any kind of defense, footwork, or noticeable artistic skill whatsoever. His attribute of power is completely in question in light of his whole “loaded gloves” scandal.

Arum even had the nerve of matching Margarito against his most prized fighter at the time Miguel Cotto, knowing that Margarito was playing dirty.

The result of the match up would produce a great fight, with Cotto suffering his first loss as a professional, and irreversible damage done to him mentally and physically as a result of the relentless pressure from a brick fisted Margarito.

To continue on with Cotto, another disservice to him was matching him up against Pacquiao a year after the Margarito debacle. Especially considering the circumstances behind their fight.

Requiring Cotto to meet Pacquiao at a catch weight to defend his own title is criminal. And because Cotto did not comply with the original orders from general Arum, Cotto was stripped of his WBO welterweight belt and told that even if he were to defeat Pacquiao he would not even win his championship belt back. It would then be vacant.

Also matching Cotto in the fight against Pacquiao and knowing he wasn’t the same fighter is a shame and shows how little Arum thinks of Cotto in my opinion. Any person that follows the sport could tell Cotto wasn’t the same fighter since his encounter with Margarito. His struggles against Joshua Clottey and other opposition since indicates such.

Another thing Arum does with many of his fighters is cater to certain markets or ethnic fan bases, and match particular fighters up against soft opposition, marketing those fighters as great because of the fandom dedication and support. Take Kelly Pavlik and Julio Caesar Chavez Jr. for example.

Pavlik is a fighter who appeals to middle America for a number of reasons. He has an action first appeasing style and he is white. Because of his look, he may appeal to a particular crowd that may also like mixed martial arts and Arum’s goal may have been trying to lure them in with Pavlik. I think Arum tried to hype him up as a “white hope” and did manage to make some money off of it.

Through his career, Pavlik has been matched against inferior opposition and faced about three good or great fighters. Jermain Taylor, Bernard Hopkins and Sergio Martinez.

Entering the Martinez fight, they probably thought Martinez was too small, and in regards to Hopkins based of his performance against Joe Calzaghe, they probably thought he was on his last legs and ready to get wilt and wither away.

Chavez Jr. has pretty much faced nothing but scrubs his entire career. He has been on the receiving end of beneficial scoring and gift decisions. He had life and death bouts against Sebastian Zbik, Matt Vanda, Carlos Molina and Troy Rowland, (who?).

This guy is a WBC middleweight champion and he is fighting guys like Peter Manfredo? Manfredo hasn’t been relevant since the now defunct reality show “Contender” and is hardly a contender nowadays.

But because of the legendary Chavez name, and brilliant promotion and matchmaking, he seems to get a pass.

Look at Manny Pacquiao. A talented fighter in his own right, but he is hyped up as the greatest thing since sliced bread. He’s not even the best fighter in his division.

He has a nice guy personality and an exciting fighting style. Add in biased commentary from huge media networks like HBO and ESPN, and washed up opposition and you have a superstar.

Recently matching Pacquiao against the likes of Shane Mosley, Antonio Margarito, David Diaz, Miguel Cotto, etc. and looking at the circumstances behind each fight, it’s just terrible.

Even with the Marquez fights, for the second and third fight especially, Arum was banking on Marquez being on the downside and not the same fighter he once was. Especially with Marquez being 38 years old and moving up two weight divisions.

It kind of back fired with Marquez in their most recent bout, because in the eyes of many once again, he looked to have defeated Pacquiao on points. I know Arum didn’t foresee Pacquiao getting schooled by Marquez, otherwise he probably wouldn‘t of made this fight to begin with.

But because of the controversy behind the fight, Arum is trying to make a fourth fight between the two, instead of a fight with Pacquiao facing Mayweather.

Arum plays off the loyalty of the Filipino fan base, among other fan bases, and has the general public fooled.

This guy is a bonafide liar. He has even admitted his deceit in failed negotiations for the Mayweather-Pacquiao fight. Bob Arum Mr. “Yesterday I was lying, today I am telling the truth.”

Ask federal judge Daniel Weinstein about Arum’s deceit. The man has a history of bribery charges stemming back from 1995.

The truth is, he never wanted to make the Pacquiao-Mayweather fight. He doesn’t want to make the fight because he knows what is going to happen, and I have been telling people this for years. Arum knows like any other person that has clear understanding of boxing that Mayweather will probably beat Pacquiao, and rather easily.

Mayweather like Marquez is a counter puncher, and the best defensive fighter of his era. He is technically skilled, is just as fast as Pacquiao and has a five inch reach advantage. And he is bigger and stronger than a 38 year old Marquez, who recently gave Pacquiao fits.

You can do the math.

But instead Arum and his buddies at ESPN want to say Pacquiao agreed to every demand, (which they didn’t), and Mayweather is afraid of Pacquiao’s new and improved right hand, (something they have been claiming for years). I’d ask Marquez is Pacquiao’s right hand has improved but he was rarely touched by it.

Based on what we know about Arum, I don’t know whether to criticize him or actually give him props for duping the common fan.

At the end of the day, he is just trying to make money and has no interest in putting out the best fight for the fans and has no intentions of helping the sport of boxing as a whole.

He has a history of screwing fighters over. He makes a ton of money and takes a ton of money from Pacquiao. He did the same with De La Hoya and Mayweather, but they wised up and left.

He is a greedy old man, who will continue to use fans like puppets, in order to make his fair share of money while screwing over boxers and the fans in the process.

Original Source:

Yes I am sure Mr. Pacquiao and his legions of fans are enjoying the spoils of his recent success and have every right to do so.


Photo Credit : Chris Farina – Top Rank

To many of us in the United States, he is celebrated as a great fighter. But around the world, especially in his homeland in the Philippines, he is celebrated as a great fighter, a politician, an ambassador of sportsmanship and acknowledged as a national hero.

But for the last three or four years of his professional boxing career, Pacquiao has not really accomplished anything to be celebrated for. At least not to the degree he currently is being heralded as.

His promoter Bob Arum, the HBO network, some friendly, misinformed ESPN analysts, and others in the different forums of media, have done a great job of marketing him as the figure he is today.

He is heralded as possibly one of the greatest fighters of all time, and currently according to the “Pacquiao promoters,” the greatest fighter of this era.

The question is what has Pacquiao really accomplished throughout his career?

Yes he has dozens of alphabet titles across several weight divisions, and a numerous supply of recognizable names on his resume.

Is he a great fighter? Yes no question, but his accomplishments especially as of late should hold an asterisk next to it.

How about we go over the opponent selection the last three years or so and you can decide for yourself.

While analyzing a fight, many people just look at the names on paper and depending on the names they see and the history of each person, they determine whether it’s a good fight or not.

People see Pacquiao vs. De La Hoya, and because of the history of each fighter come to the conclusion that it’s a good match up.

A funny thing is, people tend to conveniently neglect the circumstances of each fight. You have to look at the styles of each fighter, the recent history, and other things to determine the status of each fighter and the fight itself.

HBO boxing analyst Larry Merchant makes a habit of criticizing or finding some sort of flaw in every single opponent Floyd Mayweather has faced.

An interesting note is recently Pacquiao has faced many of the same opponents Mayweather has faced, the same opponents Merchant has criticized, but only after Mayweather beat them.

Strange thing is, whenever Pacquiao goes up against that same opponent, and ultimately beats them, he gets all the praise in the world and there is no criticism from Merchant and some of the other analysts in the boxing world.

Those opponents include Oscar De La Hoya, Ricky Hatton and Shane Mosley. Mayweather and Pacquiao also faced Juan Manuel Marquez, with Pacquiao having faced Marquez before Mayweather.

Speaking of Marquez, he is the first fighter we’ll begin with while analyzing Pacquiao’s opponent selection over the past couple of years.

In 2008, the long awaited rematch between Pacquiao and Marquez for Marquez’s WBC Super Featherweight title took place.

This is the best fight for Pacquiao at the time, and because of the cerebral counterpunching style of Marquez, probably his most challenging. Can’t criticize Pacquiao for this fight, I commend him for this fight and he should get nothing but respect for taking this challenge.

After a tough fight against Marquez, which resulted in a controversial split decision victory for Pacquiao, he decides to move up in weight and fight David Diaz for an alphabet title in the lightweight division.

It should be noted at the time Diaz was the weakest title holder of the division, not really an upper tier fighter, basically a paper champion. He arguably lost to a faded Erik Morales prior to facing Pacquiao.

People remarked on the transformation of Pacquiao in his fight against Diaz. He looked stronger, faster, better conditioned and he outclassed Diaz. Perhaps it was the opponent, the addition of new strength and conditioning coach Alex Ariza, or maybe a combination of both. Whichever the case may be, he easily disposed of Diaz.

Later on in the year, Pacquiao would take on the faded legend Oscar De La Hoya, in a bout that was advertised as a “Dream Match.”

The fight took place at a catch weight, which was at the welterweight limit, which is a division Oscar has not even stepped in over seven years.

Granted, this was Pacquiao’s first bout above 135 pounds, so you would think there was some risk for him as well.

There would be a risk, if it were against a live opponent, something Oscar clearly wasn’t. His previous fight against Steve Forbes proved that.

Pacquaio’s head trainer Freddie Roach offered his opinions on the current form of De La Hoya to FoxSports.com stating, “From the Mayweather fight, to the Forbes fight, to the Pacquiao fight, there was a steady decline in Oscar.”

And also added, “Don’t kill yourself to make weight, don’t burn yourself out. Fight at a more natural weight, that’s what Pacquiao did.”

“I saw the IV in his arms, I saw the fresh IV marks. They hydrated him too late. He was dehydrated after the fight, I got the report in from the doctors, it was dehydration.”

Anyone who knows boxing could see the deterioration in De La Hoya. Pacquiao’s trainer Freddie Roach even said it.

After the demolition of the Golden Boy, Pacquiao sought out England’s Ricky Hatton.

Entering the fight against Pacquiao, Hatton was coming off a devastating knock out loss against Floyd Mayweather and had questionable performances against Juan Lazcano and Paulie Malignaggi.

Some people, including Roach, saw the same decline in Hatton as they did with De La Hoya.

In an interview with FightFan.com, Roach commented on Hatton saying, “He’s not the same fighter as he was before the Mayweather fight, I think Mayweather took something out of him. He looked pretty shaky in the Lazcano fight.”

It’s obvious Hatton was a shell of his former self. It was even noted by the BBC in his sparring sessions leading up to his fight with Pacquiao, as he was getting outclassed by Cuban amateur star Erislandy Lara and was dismissed early because of the punishment he was dealing to Hatton.

New trainer Floyd Mayweather Sr. turned out to be an experiment gone wrong in the corner of Hatton and he was quickly disposed of.

After failed negotiations with the Mayweather team, Top Rank promoter Bob Arum continues a trend that will be noticeable in upcoming Pacquiao fights.

Matching Pacquiao with fighters on the downslide or at a catch weight, that may also happen to be under Top Rank Promotions.

After the Hatton fight, with Mayweather on the backburner, the match up of Manny Pacquiao vs. Miguel Cotto came into fruition.

The problem with this fight is, Cotto is a one year removed from the monstrous beating he took from the hands of Antonio Margarito and only a few months removed from his controversial victory over Joshua Clottey.

The hand wrap scandal with Margarito is highly publicized. While it is unknown whether he used illegal hand wraps against Cotto in their bout, it’s clearly evident to most boxing experts and fans that Cotto was not the same person after that fight, and there has been an obvious decline since.

In an interview with therewillbeblood.com, Freddie Roach stated, “The big thing right now is he the same fighter that he once was since the fight with Margarito, how much did that take out of him? He took a lot of punishment in that fight, he hasn’t really looked good since that fight.”

It’s bad enough Cotto struggled against Clottey prior to his fight against Pacquiao. To add to that, he changed trainers after a fall out with his uncle/trainer Evangelista Cotto. If that wasn’t bad enough, in order to secure a fight with Pacquiao, Cotto had to meet him at a catch weight of 145 pounds.

Last I checked, the welterweight limit is 147.

When Cotto decided to make a stand and chose not to defend his title because of the catch weight issue, Cotto was stripped of his welterweight title thanks to his own promoter Arum and WBO president Francisco Varcarcel. Cotto was then informed even if he were to emerge victorious, the title would become vacant.

After defeating Cotto at the catch weight of 145 pounds for the WBO Welterweight title, Pacquiao elected to fight Ghanaian native Joshua Clottey after negotiations with Floyd Mayweather failed again.

Clottey is not a bad fighter and at the time was generally considered a top ten welterweight, some may argue top five. I certainly thought of Clottey as a talented fighter with boxing skills.

The only problem I saw with Clottey is his tendency to fall short in big fights, and from a stylistic standpoint, this was not a good match for him because he lacks mobility and is not a high volume puncher.

At the time of the cancellation of the bout between Shane Mosley and Andre Berto, I’m sure many fans would of liked to see Pacquiao take the challenge and face Mosley. Mosley at the time, was the number one recognized welterweight after his destruction of Margarito.

Everyone has their own opinion on who Pacquiao can choose as an opponent. But to Freddie Roach, it is all to clear.

According to Roach in an interview with Therewillbeblood.com, he states, “We can make twice the amount of money fighting Cotto than we can Shane. So that’s the way we are gonna go, it’s a business right now.”

Roach continued to add, “Shane came to my gym twice to negotiate the fight with me. I say Shane can you make 142, 143, he says no. I say well then there’s no fight. He says you fought Oscar at 147, I say you’re not Oscar.”

“He’s better than Oscar, you know the thing is, why should I give him an advantage you know. Manny holds the 140 pound title, we’re not looking to go up and fight for his title.”

Yet Pacquiao went up and took Cotto’s welterweight belt at the catch weight of 145?

After the one sided beat down of Top Rank compatriot Clottey, Pacquiao decided to face the currently inactive and controversial Antonio Margarito.

Margarito entered his bout against Pacquiao having recently struggled against perennial tomato can Roberto Garcia. Before the Garcia fight, Margarito was suspended a year from boxing because of his illegal hand wrap situation.

Even before his suspension took place, in his first title defense after conquering Miguel Cotto, Margarito was physically dominated and ultimately knocked out by Shane Mosley.

So coming off recent inactivity, a knockout loss and a life and death victory over a fringe contender, Margarito somehow gets a shot against Pacquiao for a vacant junior middleweight title. The same title that was stripped from p4p elite Sergio Martinez. That in itself doesn’t make any kind of sense.

If that isn’t bad enough, there was a catch weight for this fight as well.

The junior middleweight limit is 154 pounds, this bout took place at 150 pounds.

This fight was hyped up and advertised as a David vs. Goliath match up with Margarito being some sort of gigantic, unstoppable force.

But as predicted by actual boxing experts, this fight was heavily one sided in Pacquiao’s favor, although he did have a few scary moments in the fight.

Next up to bat for team Pacquiao, Shane Mosley. This would have been a good fight if the match was made a year or two ago.

But after Pacquiao’s initial refusal to fight, Mosley since went up against and lost a one sided clinic to Floyd Mayweather, and looked dreadful in his draw against Sergio Mora at junior middleweight.

After the two consecutive pitiful performances from Mosley, for whatever reason, Pacquiao decided to face Mosley. What was hyped up as one the great action packed fights of the year turned out to be one of the worst aesthetically pleasing fights of recent memory.

When it was all said and done, it was another one sided victory, over a down the hill, outmatched opponent for Pacquiao.

Which brings us back to Juan Manuel Marquez. They are scheduled to meet in the ring for the third time November 12th of this year.

These two fighters, great in their own right, have a well documented rivalry. Their two previous fights produced a controversial draw and split decision victory for Pacquiao in the second fight.

Honestly, you can make valid arguments for either fighter on as to who won each fight. Many including myself, wanted to see a third fight between the two to cap off the trilogy.

While it is finally happening, I’ll make the case the timing is off and it’s a tad too late for this fight to be happening.

An immediate fight between the two should have followed after the second fight if anything, instead the path Pacquiao chose ran its course, leaving Marquez chasing Pacquiao from division to division.

It was a wise choice for Pacquiao, as his popularity, status in the boxing world and income has sky rocketed because of this path.

Going back to the fight, being that it is at a catch weight of 144 pounds is another problem. The only way for Marquez to get this fight was to agree to fight above 135, where he has no business at.

He tried that once before, and was outclassed against Mayweather in his come back fight after an 18 month absence.

Marquez recently fought a tune up at 140 against some no hoper named Likar Ramos and is body looked terrible. Marquez couldn’t even get up to 140, he weighed in at 138.

In regards to the Pacquiao fight, look, I’ll save you the suspense. Marquez’s style and his ability to counterpunch will always present problems for Pacquiao. Unfortunately for him, he is getting up there in age and he does not carry the extra weight as well as Pacquiao does and is at a disadvantage.

Marquez will have his moments, but I can’t foresee him lasting more than six rounds. The outcome of this fight is not in question. I am curious as to who the next opponent for Pacquiao will be.

Will Pacquiao face recent ko victim Victor Ortiz? Or maybe Zab Judah? Or will it be old rival Erik Morales for a fourth time? Rest assured, I doubt a fight with Floyd Mayweather, Amir Khan or anyone who can offer a challenge is on the horizon.

And that’s the thing. The so called p4p king has been facing questionable opposition in recent years. But because he has a nice personality, the backing of major networks and an outstanding promoter, people fail to acknowledge it.

These ESPN and HBO experts either lack the knowledge they claim to have or refuse to acknowledge what the real issue is because they think of Pacquiao as such a nice guy.

Guys like Skip Bayless, Michael Wilbon, Larry Merchant and many others are clearly clueless about the sport or must have some sort of bias.

Sprinkle in some contradicting, biased commentary from old time boxing reporter Bert Sugar and the mission is complete.

One of the few people that calls it like it is and that actually has experience in the boxing world and is renowned for his abilities of being a world class trainer is Teddy Atlas.

Some may ask, who else could Pacquiao have faced to have the legitimacy of being called the p4p king?

At lightweight, or even super featherweight, Pacquiao could of fought guys like Juan Diaz, Zahir Raheem, Joan Guzman, Joel Casamayor or even Michael Katsidis. Instead he fought David Diaz.

At junior welterweight and above, there’s guys like Timothy Bradley, Amir Khan, Floyd Mayweather, or even Devon Alexander. But instead it was deteriorated versions of Ricky Hatton and Miguel Cotto.

He could of went out and fought Shane Mosley at an earlier time, but he waited for him to show even more signs of decline. He is probably is waiting on Mayweather to do the same.

The intent of this article isn’t to discredit Manny Pacquiao. He is obviously a talented fighter and has achieved a lot especially as of late.

I am pointing out the obvious, and whether you like it or not the truth is in plain sight.

Refusing to take random blood tests is not a valid excuse to duck Mayweather. If you’re a clean fighter as you claim to be, there shouldn’t be a problem. Ortiz agreed to it, as did Mosley.

You can complain and say the random Olympic style testing is beyond the jurisdiction and not part of the Nevada State Athletic Commission regulations and rules, and you‘re correct in stating that.

But neither are the demands you and your team make. Your weight request for the gloves, the ten million dollar weight penalty and the ring size concessions (that oh by the way Mayweather agreed to) are not part of the rules and regulations of the Nevada State Athletic Commission.

According to the Nevada State Athletic Commission, for welterweight bouts, the gloves are required to be ten ounces unless both parties can agree to a different weight requirement for the gloves. I believe you wanted eight ounce gloves.

Fighting for titles at catch weights, dictating weight penalties, etc. is not a part of the Nevada State Athletic Commission.

Getting into the whole blood testing thing is a series of articles in itself. With that said, Mayweather is willing to undergo the same random testing you will be going through. There is no advantage.

And if you continue to refuse to fight Mayweather, then fight a decent fighter in their prime. Step up, test yourself and give the fans a legit reason to cheer for you.

Original Source:

Tonight is the night. Saturday October 15th, live from the Staple Center in Los Angeles, California, living legend Bernard Hopkins defends his light heavyweight crown against the once proclaimed air to the throne Chad Dawson.


Photo: Tom Hogan/HoganPhotos/Golden Boy

This match up tagged as a battle for light heavyweight supremacy, features the two best fighters in the division.

Hopkins enters this fight after a pair of sensational performances against a multiple division champion Jean Pascal.

The first bout between Hopkins and Pascal ended with a controversial draw and the second bout ending with a decision victory for Hopkins, making him at age 46 the oldest man to hold a legitimate championship.

What makes this intriguing is Pascal was the first fighter to defeat Dawson.

For those keeping track as we have it, Hopkins beat Pascal, who beat Dawson, but even with that formula, it is not a given Hopkins will beat Dawson. But being an astute student of the game like Hopkins is, there is certainly some things he can pick up on and use against Dawson tonight.

Dawson is an extremely gifted fighter. Some may argue he is the most talented fighter north of the middleweight division.

Dawson possesses dazzling hand speed, has the ability to throw fluid combinations and has some pop behind his punches.

What has plagued him throughout his career is his inability to maintain focus through the course of an entire fight. There has been a few instances where he has not been very assertive offensively and gives off the impression of a lackadaisical effort overall.

Despite those flaws, Dawson has amassed an impressive record of 30-1 (17 ko’s) and is a multiple division champion. Fans and critics are frustrated because they see the talent, there are just waiting for Dawson to put everything together and be a consistent fighter.

It would be unfair to compare the entire career’s of each fighter when making a case for who is better or who will win tonight’s fight. But a fair assessment can be made by comparing the last few years or even the last five bouts for each fighter.

In that case, Hopkins gets the edge as he looked a little bit better against Kelly Pavlik, Enrique Ornelas, Roy Jones and Jean Pascal, compared to how Dawson looked in his fights against Antonio Tarver, Glen Johnson, Jean Pascal and Adrian Diaconu.

The Roy Jones bout was terrible though, a fight that should never, ever take place again.

As how the fight turns out, I expect the executioner to execute a sensational game plan. Hopkins will frustrate Dawson early and often, with his pressure and patented rough house tactics. As the fight progresses, Hopkins will systematically breakdown Dawson.

Dawson excels at a slow pace, and will be better off at a slower pace, unless he is the one initiating the action and taking the fight to Hopkins.

The problem is he hasn’t shown to be assertive offensively in recent fights and if that trend remains in this fight Hopkins will capitalize off that similar to what Glen Johnson did to Dawson in their first fight back in 2008, and like what Pascal did to Dawson last year.

From a physical aspect, Dawson has all of the advantages against the older fighter Hopkins.

Even though Dawson sports the physical advantages, he doesn’t completely dwarf his opponent and Hopkins has enough tools and tactics in his arsenal to overwhelm most of his opponents.

This fight is going to boil down to who has more mental strength. And it seems Hopkins has an unlimited supply.

He knows the weaknesses of Dawson and will use every trick in the book to gain whatever edge or advantage he can in this fight.

He knows how to fight when tired, hurt and knows how to win even when the odds are stacked against him.

Factor all of that in with the recent issues with the Dawson camp, the financial problems, changes with management and most recently with his head trainers, I see Hopkins emerging victorious tonight.

Hopkins by unanimous decision, in a somewhat entertaining fight.

Original Source:

I have to say that was crazy, action packed night, with a great fight card and pay-per-view event that was memorable to say the least. With of course, the so called “controversial” ending to cap off the evening.

There was a lively crowd in attendance, with electricity mounting as the tension in the MGM Grand building in Las Vegas, Nevada, was intensifying second by second, with anticipation for the potential fireworks to take place in the main event.


Photo: Tom Hogan/Hogan Photos

Amidst all the controversy that occurred later in the evening, the entire fight card was actually an entertaining one.

Jesse Vargas fought a competitive sea-saw match against Josesito Lopez.

Mexican legend Erik Morales fought a blood and guts war against the tough but relatively unknown Pablo Cesar Cano for some form of a WBC Light Welterweight Championship belt.

While at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, California, rising Mexican star Saul ‘Canelo’ Alvarez fought a competitive match against a game Alfonso Gomez. A fight that actually had a controversial quick stoppage in itself.

Now to the juicy stuff.

Every pugilist participating in the event is good fighter in their own right, but the entire boxing world was curious to see the return of perennial top p4p performer Floyd Mayweather, and how he would fair against the younger, stronger, exciting young champion Victor Ortiz.

Ortiz went up against Mayweather who was returning to the ring after a 16 month layoff. A great fight was expected, and through four rounds, an exciting one sided fight was taking place.

Seeming to not have any fear at all leading into the event, Ortiz looked the part at least from a physical standpoint, possessing a solid muscular frame, looking like a well polished army tank and even sported a 14 pound weight advantage.

But his eyes and body language throughout the fight told a different story.

From the moment you heard Michael Buffer’s magical voice introduce the fighters, the look in Ortiz’s eyes indicated to me all of the pressure, the gigantic magnitude of this event, the big moment was getting to him.

From the opening bell, Ortiz was feasting on straight right hand leads, check left hooks, jabs, and right handed body punches all night.

Unable to quite figure out the puzzle that is the Mayweather defense, Ortiz would land an occasional body punch, or a glancing blow up top on a few occasions, but most of his punches were blocked or dodged altogether.

Many of his rampant attacks against the ropes were nullified and ineffective. The most effective blows from Ortiz were his rabbit punches to the back of the head which are illegal, and the head butts he intentionally threw and I counted at least three head butts.

As the rounds went on, Mayweather’s dominance became more apparent and Ortiz’s confidence seemed to dwindle.

It was obvious to any unbiased spectator the difference in class between the two fighters, and if they kept the current the pace, Ortiz was going to wilt under the pressure of Mayweather’s pin point accuracy and power punches.

And with that in mind, some people believe Ortiz looked for a way out.

Ortiz pressed on, trying to impose his size and pushed Mayweather into the ropes towards the end of the 4th round, throwing a flurry of punches that mainly missed the intended target.

Perhaps out of frustration, Ortiz did his best impersonation of a billy goat and head butted Mayweather. He even threw a few punches after the intentional foul.

Referee Joe Cortez called for time to deduct a point from Ortiz.

After Ortiz apologized to Mayweather two or three times, including a hug and kiss on the cheek, referee Joe Cortez said “lets go,” to both fighters.

Bam it happened.

Ortiz offered one more ceremonial touching of the gloves while Cortez looked at ringside officials to check the time, and Mayweather landed a quick left hook, right cross combination that sent Ortiz to the canvas.

And that was it, show was over.

Some people call it dirty, I say it’s an eye for an eye.

Ortiz took it there initially and had been doing so with his tactics all night. And you can’t fault that, if you’re going to fight the best, do what you can to win and do your best.

But if you’re going to get rough, expect it in return. Do not blatantly foul someone and then hug them and expect everything is going to forgotten.

Ortiz forgot the cardinal rule in boxing, protect yourself at all times.

Let’s not forget Ortiz was losing badly as well. Perhaps an argument can be made giving him round two, but even that’s generous and the dominance from Mayweather was apparent.

According to Compubox, Mayweather landed 73 out of 208 punches for 35%, while Ortiz 26 out of 148 punches for 18%.

Call Floyd a jerk, an ass, whatever. I am not going to defend his personal life, or what he does outside the ring, that’s for whoever to judge.

But at the end of the day like him or not, you have to respect his skill and accomplishments in the ring, and he is unfairly criticized by many members of the media.

Especially by so called journalists, trainers and analysts working for HBO.

Their lack of professionalism is disturbing, and they should seriously consider hiring a new commentary team.

Individually and collectively as a group you guys are unprofessional. You guys are biased against certain fighters, not just Floyd, and you let your personal feelings get in the way of calling a fight. Call the fight for what it is.

It’s obvious every member on the team dislikes Mayweather, which is not a problem, but it shouldn’t translate over to your professional life.

Jim Lampley arguably is the worse play by play commentator of all time. His inaccuracies are astounding, sometimes I wonder which fight he is watching. Every fight he does folly after folly saying a punch lands when it doesn’t. The only thing saving him is his charismatic voice.

Emmanuel Steward always flips flops and continually harps on Mayweather not constantly throwing combinations, but fails to mention the other positive things Mayweather does do. Not every boxer fights the same, there are different styles and when Mayweather actually did throw some combinations, Steward didn’t even say anything. He talks like he is upset he never had a chance to train him or something.

Larry Merchant, a guy who has contributed immensely to the craft and professions of journalism and television broadcasting should know better by now what is he 83? As the elder statesmen, you should be leading by example and act more professional.

Instead you act just as immature as the fighters you criticize. I’m sure your journalistic contemporary, Rush Limbaugh would be proud.

Especially since you have a history of going at it with black fighters in particular such as Roy Jones, Mike Tyson, Bernard Hopkins, Winky Wright, Marvin Hagler, George Foreman, the aforementioned Mayweather and I am sure the list goes on and on.

The commentary from Merchant was terrible and the post fight interview was humoring. At the end of the day, if you act as immature as the people you criticize then you get what you deserve in the end.

Overall from a boxing purist stand point, the event was a success. Most of the fights were competitive, there was action in every fight, there was just an unfortunate ending, brought on mostly by Ortiz himself.

It will be interesting to see what happens from here on out in the boxing world, but I’m sure all eyes will be watching.

Original Source:

I’m sure by now many viewers have witnessed the 24/7 episodes and all of the other pre-fight promotional shows leading up to this highly anticipated block buster match up.

Golden Boy Promotions, Victor Ortiz, Floyd Mayweather, and everyone involved from the respective camps are doing a great job so far in regards to hyping up this fight.


Photo by Gene Blevins/HoganPhoto

As a result, there are many opinions on how the fight will turn out from media and fans alike.

But it seems the overall consensus from most boxing experts and members of the media is Mayweather is expected to win the fight, either by late round stoppage or unanimous decision.

There are many people who are rooting for the underdog Ortiz, but I highly doubt many believe he has a serious chance to actually win.


Photo by Gene Blevins/HoganPhoto

But for those staking the claim Ortiz will emerge victorious have actually made compelling arguments.

Arguing his recent maturity, punching power, size, southpaw style, and youth will carry him to victory.

Which brings into mind a huge question that is the biggest x factor in this fight, and is something that will not be answered until we finally see these pugilistic warriors step inside the ring this Saturday.

Which Floyd Mayweather are we going to see?

Based on what we have witnessed from both fighters throughout their careers, we can estimate who has the edge in categories such as speed, power, durability, technique, ring generalship, etc.

And even the average boxing spectator would probably give Mayweather the edge in most of those categories. At least a prime Mayweather would probably have the edge.

But that’s the thing, we do not know what to expect, especially from a fighter coming off a 16 month lay off.

The self proclaimed main money maker in the sport, hasn’t done himself any favors with his inactivity in recent years.

This being his fourth fight in five years probably is not ideal for any elite boxer and he would have to admit that himself. I’m certain the sport of boxing would flourish even more with an active Floyd Mayweather as well.

An occasional break from such a demanding occupation is a good thing because any sport can be taxing on the body and mind. But historically, constant spans of inactivity does more harm than good for most boxers.

I do believe there has been a slight erosion of athleticism and reflexes in recent fights from Mayweather.

Although he doesn’t get hit a lot or accumulate a huge amount of damage in the ring, he does train incredibly hard so there is probably some wear and tear and as you get older your skills fade little by little.

At 34, Mayweather is no spring chicken.

But it happens with every fighter, every athlete period.

Marvin Hagler, Ray Leonard, Roy Jones, Julio Cesar Chavez, any and everybody slips up eventually because at the end of the day, father time is undefeated.

The question is when will it happen for Mayweather?

He had better hope it doesn’t happen in this fight, because if so he is going to be in for a world of pain.

Although he is not in his prime, I do not believe he is far removed from his prime. And aside from Bernard Hopkins he is probably the best ring tactician so he has that to fall back on but we really won’t know until we watch the fight on Saturday.

This is what makes this fight so interesting to watch.

Yes there is a lot of trash talk and Floyd is the self imposed “villain” so of course people want to watch him get pummeled to a pulp.

There is also a chance of witnessing greatness from one of the truly remarkable fighters of his generation, Floyd Mayweather, and the potential rise of an exciting star in the making Victor Ortiz.

There is a chance of fireworks taking place in the ring because Ortiz is a hungry fighter with something to prove. But with that said, Mayweather is hungry as well.

I’m certain the constant talk of Manny Pacquiao being heralded as his pound for pound superior is getting to him.

Although he may constantly talk about the importance of making money, deep down he has the heart and mind of a fighter and is a true competitor. Even his detractors can’t dispute that.

He wants to prove he’s the best of his era and an all time great. He’s arguably the best of his era and a hall of famer already, but we won’t know how truly great he is until it’s all said and done.

With that in mind, a fight with Manny Pacquiao or Sergio Martinez is inevitable. I think he has to fight one of the two, Pacquiao in particular, if he wants to receive the all time great recognition he desires.

But in order for either one of those match ups to re enter the conversation, Mayweather must get past Ortiz.

Will he be able to do so?