Posts Tagged ‘PPV’

Original Source:

It’s a double dip of rematches headlining the boxing weekend.

The main attraction headlining the HBO line-up features Miguel Cotto seeking revenge against Antonio Margarito.

With the historic rivalry between Mexico and Puerto Rico boxers already, and the history between the two fighters that even precedes this fight, this is a compelling rivalry that has developed between the two Top Rank fighters.

The first fight between the two was a classic championship welterweight bout that took place in Las Vegas, Nevada back in June of 2008.

Cotto started out strong, displaying his technical superiority in the early rounds but Margarito’s pressure and will overwhelmed Cotto during the middle rounds and well into the later rounds which ultimately resulted in a Tko stoppage for Tijuana Tornado.

This would result in the first loss of Cotto’s career, as well as physical and psychological damage that may be beyond repair as since the fight Cotto has not looked like the same fighter.

A trail of controversy has followed Margarito’s since his win over Cotto beginning immediately when he squared off against Shane Mosley in 2009. It was discovered by Mosley’s trainer Naazim Richardson, that Margarito was attempting to enter the ring in his fight against Mosley, wearing loaded hand wraps.

Many have suspected along with Cotto himself, is Margarito may have used the same illegal wraps in their bout.

No one but Margarito, his promoter Bob Arum and his trainer at the time Javier Capetillo, knows what really happened that night with the hand wrap situation. I believe this is probably something Margarito has been doing for a long time, and it wouldn’t surprise me if his promoter had prior knowledge of this illegal activity taking place.

Regardless, this is an intriguing match up because of the personal emotions involved. Neither fighter likes each other, they probably do not have any respect for one another, and this fight is personal on many levels.

HBO did a great job hyping up this event, with the Face Off and 24/7 episodes respectively, promoting this fight. Both programs gave an in depth view of the relationships of the fighters, the ups and downs, family life, training camps, basically the paths each fighter has taken since their initial bout three years ago.

As for how the fight will turn out, unfortunately both fighters are shells of their former selves. Cotto has not looked the same physically since his fight with Margarito, and has struggled against Joshua Clottey, got annihilated against Manny Pacquiao, and did not look too impressive in his most recent fight against a washed up Ricardo Mayorga.

Margarito looks like he is on the decline as well. After Mosley utterly destroyed him, he was suspended for a year and looked bad in his comeback fight against Roberto Garcia. Margarito was then steam rolled by Pacquiao, who arguably administered one of the worst beatings in Margarito’s career.

They have both accumulated a lot of damage over the past three years including in their own fight, and I do not expect to see prime versions of either fighter. Margarito also has an eye issue, a n injury he suffered against Pacquiao and I think the injury is worse than what the public was lead to believe. The only reason this fight is continuing is because of the financial implications behind the fight.

As for who will win, I believe Cotto is the emotional favorite, the crowd will support him being there is a strong support for Puerto Rican fighters in New York, and I believe many people sympathizes with his whole story. I am personally rooting for Cotto, but I think if Margarito has anything left in the tank, he has the style that will beat Cotto.

Hand wraps aside, Margarito’s physical and mental pressure wore Cotto down and if that trend continues in the second fight, I see the same result occurring again.

If Cotto is to win this fight I believe he should target Margarito’s body as well as his damaged eye. Cotto would also do well to clinch occasionally and not let Margarito get into a rhythm. Mosley effectively implored this tactic in his win against Margarito, and Cotto would benefit from this as well.

Like stated before if Margarito does resemble some of his old self, I do expect his pressure to overwhelm Cotto.

The promoter of both fighters Bob Arum has other plans, as I’m sure he is hoping for a Cotto victory so he can attempt to pull off a third fight between the two in the future.

Also featured tonight is the bantamweight championship rematch between Abner Mares and Joseph Agbeko. This fight will take place on Showtime, and while I think this is a great fight and have anticipated this rematch for awhile, I think the timing is bad and Showtime did a poor job promoting this fight.

The first fight between the two was controversial and a great fight overall in itself. I think both fighters deserve the distinction of having the boxing public’s attention and should have all eyes on them during their bout. That won’t be the case with Cotto vs. Margarito airing on HBO at the same time but be as it may, this is going to be a great fight.

The first fight between the two was action packed, and expect much of the same in the rematch. Both fighters hurt each other, with Mares stunning Agbeko in the opening round, and with Agbeko retuning the favor in round four.

Unfortunately, Agbeko was the victim of many low blows that weren’t called by the referee and that may have played a factor in the majority decision that favored Mares.

I do think Mares will attempt to apply a more defensive game plan, and fight a more strategic fight imploring his counter punching abilities.

On the under card of the Mares-Agbeko card is a bout featuring Vic Darchinyan and Anselmo Moreno. Moreno has the style to beat Darchinyan and is very quick, but the question is whether he is ready to step up against great opposition. Darchinyan charges forward and has the power to out opponents out. He is also experienced and very cagey. An interesting fight to say the least.

Back on HBO, on the under card of the Cotto-Margarito head line, features two rising stars in Brandon Rios and Mike Jones.

Mike Jones a skilled, undefeated, powerful punching welterweight goes up against former Margarito opponent, Sebastian Lujan in an IBF title eliminator. I expect Jones to overwhelm Lujan, who after this fight may have to settle for being the division’s gatekeeper.

Brandon Rios, childhood rival to Victor Ortiz, goes up against Manchester’s John Murray in a lightweight championship bout. It was to be for a lightweight tile but Rios failed to make weight and was stripped of the title. Both fighters are young, experienced and talented. Look for Rios to pull out a tough victory in a highly competitive fight, but his body punching will lead him to victory in the end.

From the Honda Center in Anaheim, California, to Madison Square Garden in New York, New York, coast to coast this is a great weekend for boxing.

Whether if you’re a diehard or a casual fan, you’re in for a treat.

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Original Source:

I have to say that was crazy, action packed night, with a great fight card and pay-per-view event that was memorable to say the least. With of course, the so called “controversial” ending to cap off the evening.

There was a lively crowd in attendance, with electricity mounting as the tension in the MGM Grand building in Las Vegas, Nevada, was intensifying second by second, with anticipation for the potential fireworks to take place in the main event.


Photo: Tom Hogan/Hogan Photos

Amidst all the controversy that occurred later in the evening, the entire fight card was actually an entertaining one.

Jesse Vargas fought a competitive sea-saw match against Josesito Lopez.

Mexican legend Erik Morales fought a blood and guts war against the tough but relatively unknown Pablo Cesar Cano for some form of a WBC Light Welterweight Championship belt.

While at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, California, rising Mexican star Saul ‘Canelo’ Alvarez fought a competitive match against a game Alfonso Gomez. A fight that actually had a controversial quick stoppage in itself.

Now to the juicy stuff.

Every pugilist participating in the event is good fighter in their own right, but the entire boxing world was curious to see the return of perennial top p4p performer Floyd Mayweather, and how he would fair against the younger, stronger, exciting young champion Victor Ortiz.

Ortiz went up against Mayweather who was returning to the ring after a 16 month layoff. A great fight was expected, and through four rounds, an exciting one sided fight was taking place.

Seeming to not have any fear at all leading into the event, Ortiz looked the part at least from a physical standpoint, possessing a solid muscular frame, looking like a well polished army tank and even sported a 14 pound weight advantage.

But his eyes and body language throughout the fight told a different story.

From the moment you heard Michael Buffer’s magical voice introduce the fighters, the look in Ortiz’s eyes indicated to me all of the pressure, the gigantic magnitude of this event, the big moment was getting to him.

From the opening bell, Ortiz was feasting on straight right hand leads, check left hooks, jabs, and right handed body punches all night.

Unable to quite figure out the puzzle that is the Mayweather defense, Ortiz would land an occasional body punch, or a glancing blow up top on a few occasions, but most of his punches were blocked or dodged altogether.

Many of his rampant attacks against the ropes were nullified and ineffective. The most effective blows from Ortiz were his rabbit punches to the back of the head which are illegal, and the head butts he intentionally threw and I counted at least three head butts.

As the rounds went on, Mayweather’s dominance became more apparent and Ortiz’s confidence seemed to dwindle.

It was obvious to any unbiased spectator the difference in class between the two fighters, and if they kept the current the pace, Ortiz was going to wilt under the pressure of Mayweather’s pin point accuracy and power punches.

And with that in mind, some people believe Ortiz looked for a way out.

Ortiz pressed on, trying to impose his size and pushed Mayweather into the ropes towards the end of the 4th round, throwing a flurry of punches that mainly missed the intended target.

Perhaps out of frustration, Ortiz did his best impersonation of a billy goat and head butted Mayweather. He even threw a few punches after the intentional foul.

Referee Joe Cortez called for time to deduct a point from Ortiz.

After Ortiz apologized to Mayweather two or three times, including a hug and kiss on the cheek, referee Joe Cortez said “lets go,” to both fighters.

Bam it happened.

Ortiz offered one more ceremonial touching of the gloves while Cortez looked at ringside officials to check the time, and Mayweather landed a quick left hook, right cross combination that sent Ortiz to the canvas.

And that was it, show was over.

Some people call it dirty, I say it’s an eye for an eye.

Ortiz took it there initially and had been doing so with his tactics all night. And you can’t fault that, if you’re going to fight the best, do what you can to win and do your best.

But if you’re going to get rough, expect it in return. Do not blatantly foul someone and then hug them and expect everything is going to forgotten.

Ortiz forgot the cardinal rule in boxing, protect yourself at all times.

Let’s not forget Ortiz was losing badly as well. Perhaps an argument can be made giving him round two, but even that’s generous and the dominance from Mayweather was apparent.

According to Compubox, Mayweather landed 73 out of 208 punches for 35%, while Ortiz 26 out of 148 punches for 18%.

Call Floyd a jerk, an ass, whatever. I am not going to defend his personal life, or what he does outside the ring, that’s for whoever to judge.

But at the end of the day like him or not, you have to respect his skill and accomplishments in the ring, and he is unfairly criticized by many members of the media.

Especially by so called journalists, trainers and analysts working for HBO.

Their lack of professionalism is disturbing, and they should seriously consider hiring a new commentary team.

Individually and collectively as a group you guys are unprofessional. You guys are biased against certain fighters, not just Floyd, and you let your personal feelings get in the way of calling a fight. Call the fight for what it is.

It’s obvious every member on the team dislikes Mayweather, which is not a problem, but it shouldn’t translate over to your professional life.

Jim Lampley arguably is the worse play by play commentator of all time. His inaccuracies are astounding, sometimes I wonder which fight he is watching. Every fight he does folly after folly saying a punch lands when it doesn’t. The only thing saving him is his charismatic voice.

Emmanuel Steward always flips flops and continually harps on Mayweather not constantly throwing combinations, but fails to mention the other positive things Mayweather does do. Not every boxer fights the same, there are different styles and when Mayweather actually did throw some combinations, Steward didn’t even say anything. He talks like he is upset he never had a chance to train him or something.

Larry Merchant, a guy who has contributed immensely to the craft and professions of journalism and television broadcasting should know better by now what is he 83? As the elder statesmen, you should be leading by example and act more professional.

Instead you act just as immature as the fighters you criticize. I’m sure your journalistic contemporary, Rush Limbaugh would be proud.

Especially since you have a history of going at it with black fighters in particular such as Roy Jones, Mike Tyson, Bernard Hopkins, Winky Wright, Marvin Hagler, George Foreman, the aforementioned Mayweather and I am sure the list goes on and on.

The commentary from Merchant was terrible and the post fight interview was humoring. At the end of the day, if you act as immature as the people you criticize then you get what you deserve in the end.

Overall from a boxing purist stand point, the event was a success. Most of the fights were competitive, there was action in every fight, there was just an unfortunate ending, brought on mostly by Ortiz himself.

It will be interesting to see what happens from here on out in the boxing world, but I’m sure all eyes will be watching.

Original Source:

By the time perennial pound-for-pound great Floyd Mayweather steps into the ring in mid-September, it will be approximately 17-months since he saw action.

Mayweather’s last fight took place in May, against then the top welterweight in the division, “Sugar” Shane Mosley.

Much has changed since his victory over the future hall of fame fighter in their anticipated block buster match.

Former welterweight contemporaries such as Antonio Margarito, Miguel Cotto and Mosley are no longer a factor in the division, and in the eyes of many, Manny Pacquiao has risen to the ranks of undisputed pound for pound king.

In Mayweather’s anticipated return, he is already accomplishing something Pacquiao has neglected to do for several years now.

And that is facing a young, talented fighter in their prime, like Victor Ortiz.

Ortiz recently stepped up to the welterweight class and already has established himself as one of the best in the division, by completely dominating the undefeated Haitian star Andre Berto.

Granted, Ortiz isn’t the clear cut best fighter in the division, and has flaws just as most fighters do.

But after a overcoming some mental issues inside the ring, Ortiz has bounced back from his unexpected loss from Marcos Maidana.

With a rejuvenated attitude, the Kansas born brawler looks to live up to the potential many critics saw in him when he was coming up as a prospect.

Sometimes referred to as the new “Golden Boy,” Ortiz looks to make well on that name and what better way than facing one of the truly great pugilists of this era in Mayweather.

Some people see this as an easy fight for Mayweather, but that may not be the case in this match up.

Ortiz is a strong fighter, with a swarming style, and he tries to overwhelm his opponents with his aggression and power. Ortiz also has good speed, and as a southpaw, will undoubtedly put up the best effort he can.

As mentioned earlier for Mayweather, he is facing a prime, upper tier fighter, who is entering the with a ton of momentum. Ortiz just ended a fighter’s undefeated streak, and he looks to end another.

Pacquiao as great as he is, has faced questionable opposition in recent years.

After finally getting around to facing Marquez for a third time, it seems at least most fans will be getting what they wished for.

I wish this third fight would of happened a few years sooner.

The match up looks great on paper but more than likely it will not live up to expectations.

Marquez is one of the all- time great fighters in his era, but he will be 38 when he steps in the ring with Pacquiao, and in recent fights he has shown the effects of his age.

Pacquiao faced Mosley who was 39 years old, and coming off two terrible performances. Mosley was completely dominated by Mayweather in May of last year, and “Contender” star Sergio Mora fought Mosley to a lack luster draw.

When Pacquiao faced Antonio Margarito, he was coming off a tune up with a tomato can. And before that tune up against the mediocre Roberto Garcia, Margarito was suspended for a year.

Before Margarito’s suspension, he was outclassed and knocked out by Mosley. It’s bad enough Margarito had to cut an extra four pounds to make the catch weight he and Pacquiao fought at.

Miguel Cotto as well entered in fight against Pacquiao looking not too good in his recent fights. Cotto also had to meet Pacquiao at a catch weight losing and extra two pounds, which I am sure didn’t do him any favors.

Leading up to their fight, Cotto looked bad in his controversial victory over Joshua Clottey, and many argue Cotto hasn’t looked the same since he was beaten to a pulp by Margarito in their fight that took place in 2008.

Ricky Hatton was on the downslide as well. The addition of Floyd Mayweather Sr. in his corner was a miscalculated error, and the best of Hatton was taken out of him when he was knocked out by Floyd Mayweather Jr.

Just look at Hatton’s come back fight against Juan Lazcano. Hatton was rocked a few times late in the fight, and had the benefit of a hometown referee who used questionable tactics to intervene because Hatton was on the verge of being knocked out.

Oscar De La Hoya was obviously a done deal before he even stepped in the ring against Pacquiao. Pacquiao’s head trainer Freddie Roach knew this, that’s why they took the fight.

De La Hoya was entered this fight meeting at a catch weight in the welterweight division, a division he hasn’t stepped foot for seven years.

The “Golden Boy” was also coming off a loss against Mayweather, and a tough fight against Steve Forbes, and it was obvious De La Hoya wasn’t the great fighter he used to be.

Now it’s easy to find faults in Pacquiao’s recent opposition.

But the same can be said for a lot of fighters. No one has a perfect resume, and even if the guys he faced may have been coming in at a disadvantage, they still signed up and took the fight. If they lost the fight or took a brutalizing beating, that’s on them.

But I wanted to recognize and highlight what Mayweather is doing with his comeback fight.

No Ortiz isn’t the best fighter in the world. But he is a promising fighter on the upside that can be a threat to any fighter out there.

That’s all we should ask of our champions. Take a challenge, and fight some good opposition. Hopefully this fight against is the first step, assuming Mayweather wins, to going against Pacquiao in one of the biggest fights in boxing history.

For now we shall have to wait and see.

Original Source:

There are many reasons why boxing superstar Manny Pacquiao will emerge victorious Saturday, when he faces three division star Shane Mosley for the WBO Welterweight Championship at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas.

A major factor is recent activity and momentum. Pacquiao is riding a 12 fight win streak over the last five years. Mosley has three victories, two defeats and a draw over the last four years.

Comparing the two, Pacquiao has been the more active and successful fighter over the past few years.

Mosley’s last two fights were definitely poor showings. Whether it is a combination of the quality of opposition or old age is debatable, the fact is did not good spectacular in those respective fights against Floyd Mayweather and Sergio Mora.


Photo: Tom Casino/ Showtime

Mosley’s defensive discrepancies will also play a major role in how this fight turns out. Mosley is definitely easier to hit now, does not possess the same lateral movement he once had, and is not much of a counter puncher by nature.

It’s a likely possibility he will be a sitting duck inside the ring against a fighter ferocious like Pacquiao.

Facing an aggressive all out offensive fighter like Pacquiao, a few elements are crucial in order to have success.

Lateral movement, keeping the attacking fighter off balance is key, effective counter punching, timely clinching and smothering of punches, and a great jab can all be utilized to stop the force of a fighter like Pacquiao.

Unfortunately for Mosley because of father time and his overall style as a fighter, he is unable to do most of those elements just mentioned.

I can’t remember that last time I saw a consistent strong jab from Mosley; you would probably have to go back to the Lightweight days, which was over a decade ago.

Mosley lost a great deal of his lateral movement which understandably happens when you come up in age and has never been known as a counter puncher or a technical boxer.

Mosley does have a great chin, amazing heart and is still an extremely fasted handed fighter with uncanny athleticism.

But athleticism can only take you so far, because as you get older, athleticism fades.

With slower reflexes, Mosley can’t dodge the punches he used to in his younger years, and his stamina and punch output is also on the decline.

And as mentioned earlier, Mosley is not really a technical boxer. He is more of a brawler, which plays into Pacquiao’s hands.

Pacquiao is a little bit faster hand speed wise, and has the mobility to bounce around the ring as he pleases which allows him freedom to implore various strategies for this fight.

As iron chinned Mosley is, Pacquiao packs a punch and a person can only take some much damage until they succumb to the persistent output Pacquiao is capable of putting out.

Another thing to keep in mind is it’s hard to slip and roll punches coming from a relentless pugilist, especially if they as flaring from a variety of different angles.

Those are the dangers that await Mosley this upcoming Saturday when he faces Pacquiao in the one of the biggest events of the year.

Anything can occur in this combat sport, a single punch can completely alter the outcome of a fight. No one should ever be counted out especially a future hall of famer in Mosley, but more than likely, it will be a combination of different factors to go along with a combination of punches that allow Pacquiao to prevail.

Original Source:

August 26, 2011

Yes ladies and gentlemen he is back.

After a 16-month absence from the ring, boxing’s brightest super star will be returning to the squared circle in his highly anticipated comeback fight against the young, talented champion, “Vicious” Victor Ortiz.

The ever-so controversial Floyd “Money” Mayweather is slated to return September 17th at MGM Grand in Las Vegas, Nevada, in what is sure to be a Pay-Per-View extravaganza.

And what’s a huge mega fight without extensive coverage to coincide with this event?

Seemingly as an every fight ritual since it’s inception in 2007 with the Mayweather vs. De La Hoya blockbuster, HBO will be providing viewers with an in depth look at each fighter leading up to the fight with a four part reality show entitled “24/7 Mayweather-Ortiz”.

For those who don’t know, the show “24/7” is an Emmy award winning sports documentary/reality show from HBO, revolving around sportsmen or sports organizations leading up to a particular major sporting event.

In this case, it is the highly publicized bout between Mayweather and Ortiz.

The show “24/7” is a gateway entrance into each fighter’s world of training, family life, and social life.

Mayweather along with Hall of Fame fighter Oscar De La Hoya participated in the inaugural season of “24/7” and since its inception, several spin-offs have manifested to accompany other significant fights and sporting events in recent years.

Some of these series included Joe Calzaghe vs. Roy Jones Jr., Miguel Cotto vs. Manny Pacquiao, etc.

No disrespect to the other aforementioned fighters and other participants in the show, but quite honestly the 24/7 series is boring without the co-creator Mayweather.

Surrounded by his team of people, the usual suspects like head trainer Roger Mayweather, financial adviser Leonard Ellerbe, assistant trainer Rafael Garcia, business partner and friend 50 Cent.

Also making appearance with the Mayweather team is his fiancée Shantel Jackson.

Granted a vast majority of the content with Mayweather include constant conversations of fame, jealousy, wealth, cars, and other luxurious delicacies enjoyed by the money maker himself.

But in the middle of the self grandeurising, lies a mix of other elements as well.

Compelling, heated arguments and bickering amongst family members, the berating of opponents, a daily dose of ignorance here and there, all boils into interesting must see television.

Even as an avid viewer of this program, there is still the same shock value I initially witnessed when first watching this series.

The heated exchange between Mayweather Jr. and his father Mayweather Sr. was certainly a spectacle to behold and certainly difficult for me to even digest.

Exercising deeply rooted family issues on television is definitely not the easiest to witness but it certainly is ratings gold.

It’s like that analogy with car wrecks. With a car accident, you know it’s bad, but you can’t help but watch.

And of course there is also Victor Ortiz. This is the outlet to familiarize the public with his story.

The first episode introduced Ortiz, his younger brother Temo, and his trainer Danny Garcia. We are able to get a peek at what makes Ortiz the man and fighter he is today, and even his doubters can have an appreciation of how he has triumphed over many obstacles in his life.

Ortiz has a heart warming story, with he and his brother being abandoned by their parents, fighting to survive and basically finding their road to survival through the sport of boxing.

The first episode definitely did a job of defining themes for the series.

The constant theme of series will have Mayweather staring as the villain most people love to hate.

Arrogant, too flashy, an egomaniac, etc.

The other theme is the overall feel good story of the under dog Ortiz. He will be portrayed as an humble, hungry, nice, young champion, and there will probably be many people who will root for him because it.

I’m certain Mayweather doesn’t really care. At the end of the day, he is doing his job promoting the fight hate him or love him.

He is an entertainer and drama sells tickets.

It’s Floyd being Floyd, he is living up to his persona; “Pretty Boy Floyd” aka “Money Mayweather.”

This looks to be an like interesting series to say the least.